Pink Fuel Pumps Popping up in NE Nebraska for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Pink pumps are popping up at gas stations across northeast Nebraska thanks to Husker Ag. The ethanol plant located in Plainview, Nebraska, and partnering gas stations are promoting Breast Cancer Awareness Month with donations based on ethanol fuel sales through Thanksgiving.

“Breast cancer is an issue that touches all of our lives,” said Bernie Wrede, Husker Ag board member. “Our ethanol plant and retail partners thought this was a great opportunity to contribute by using renewable, locally-produced fuel.”

Husker Ag and participating stations will donate three cents for every gallon of Husker Fuel (E15) sold to breast cancer research. These stations include: Stop N Go in Hartington; Speedee Mart in Norfolk; Osmond Mini Mart in Osmond; One Stop and Tom’s Service in Pierce; and Roadrunner in Plainview.

For stations that do not currently sell Husker Fuel, Husker Ag and participating stations with higher ethanol blends will donate five cents for every gallon of straight ethanol blended with gasoline, including E10 (10 percent ethanol). These stations include: Creighton 59 in Creighton; Lewis & Clark Mini Mart in Crofton; Pilger Pride in Pilger; and The Fox Stop in Yankton, South Dakota.

“Everyone driving a vehicle will be able to participate by choosing ethanol at the pink pump,” Wrede said. “This is a simple way for drivers to support breast cancer research with an errand they complete each week – filling their gas tank.”

Husker Fuel (E15) contains 15 percent ethanol and 85 percent gasoline, and is approved for use in all vehicles 2001 or newer. Ethanol blends higher than 15 percent are for use in flex fuel vehicles only. One in seven Nebraskans are driving a flex fuel vehicle, which can run on any blend of American Ethanol up to E85 (85 percent ethanol and 15 percent gasoline). Drivers can check their owner’s manual to see if they’re driving a flex fuel vehicle. The vehicle might also have a flex fuel badge on the trunk or tailgate — or have a yellow gas cap.

American Ethanol is a clean-burning, non-toxic, renewable source of octane. Using homegrown, locally-produced ethanol reduces the levels of harmful chemicals in our fuel — and in the air we breathe.

To learn more about ethanol blends, visit www.AmericanEthanolNE.org and www.HuskerFuel.com.

Husker Ag, LLC is an ethanol production facility built by Fagen Inc. of Granite Falls, Minnesota, and designed by ICM of Colwich, Kansas. With the expansions, Husker Ag now utilizes more than 29 million bushels of corn per year to produce about 85 million gallons of denatured ethanol, expected to be at 90 million gallons by the end of 2017. Husker Ag also produces about 475,000 tons of modified wet distillers grain per year, which is fed by area cattle feeders. Currently, Husker Ag employs 51 full-time employees from several surrounding Nebraska communities including: Norfolk, Pierce, Randolph, Osmond, Plainview, Creighton, Bloomfield, Brunswick, Elgin and Tilden.

###

 

Flex Fuel Grand Opening in Gothenburg

Blue Heron Renewable Flex Fuel Plaza

GOTHENBURG, NE – Flex fuel vehicle drivers can take advantage of huge savings on E85 for just $0.85 a gallon at the Gothenburg Blue Heron Renewable Flex Fuel Plaza (1102 S. Lake Ave.) Thursday, Sept. 28, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Consumers will be limited to 30 gallons and no containers are allowed.

Lt. Governor Mike Foley, state officials and the Gothenburg Chamber of Commerce will kick off the ribbon cutting at 9:30 a.m. to mark the grand opening of the new flex fuel pumps. Complimentary refreshments will be available to customers throughout the promotion. Nebraska Ethanol Board, Nebraska Corn Board and local corn growers will be on site greeting drivers, pumping fuel, and providing giveaways.

Blue Heron is the only fuel station in Gothenburg with flex fuel pumps offering a variety of cleaner-burning ethanol blends. The flex fuel pumps now dispense E10, E15, E30, E40 and E85. The station is also strategically located along Interstate 80 (exit 211) and Highway 47.

Scott McPheeters

“There was a need and an opportunity to provide more ethanol blends at a great price in central Nebraska,” said Scott McPheeters, Nebraska Ethanol Board member and Gothenburg farmer. “Blue Heron is a great location to attract business from the more than 15,000 vehicles a day traveling on Interstate 80.”

 

In addition to state and federal grant support, ethanol producers in central Nebraska have chipped in to support Blue Heron. KAAPA Ethanol in Minden, Nebraska, sponsored fuel canopy and billboard upgrades for the station, while Nebraska Corn Processing and Anew Fuel Services in Cambridge, Nebraska, provided ethanol at a discounted price for the grand opening.

“There has been great collaboration between public and private entities to make this station a success,” said Megan Grimes, Nebraska Ethanol Board program manager. “We applaud Blue Heron for providing consumers more choice and offering cleaner-burning, homegrown fuel at a lower cost.”

E15 (15 percent ethanol and 85 percent gasoline) is approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for use in all passenger vehicles model year 2001 and newer. Ethanol blends higher than 15 percent are approved for use in flex fuel vehicles. One in seven Nebraskans are driving a flex fuel vehicle, which can run on any blend of American Ethanol up to E85 (85 percent ethanol and 15 percent gasoline). Drivers can check their owner’s manual to see if they’re driving a flex fuel vehicle. The vehicle might also have a flex fuel badge on the trunk or tailgate — or have a yellow gas cap.

A portion of Blue Heron’s fuel pump upgrades were paid for with the Access Ethanol Nebraska (AEN), a grant program administrated by the Nebraska Corn Board, Nebraska Ethanol Board and Nebraska Department of Agriculture, with the Nebraska Energy Office as the lead agency. Nebraska’s federal award of approximately $2.3 million for the AEN program came from the USDA’s Commodity Credit Corporation’s Biofuel Infrastructure Partnership (BIP). USDA rules require that the USDA funds be matched dollar for dollar with funds from state, private industry or foundations. Matching funds will come from the Nebraska Corn Board through the state corn checkoff funds paid by Nebraska corn farmers and from the Nebraska Environmental Trust approved funding of $500,000 for each of the two years. Matching funds will also come from contributions made by individual ethanol plants and “Prime the Pump,” a nonprofit organized and funded by the ethanol industry to improve ethanol infrastructure.

Nelson Appointed to Serve on Nebraska Ethanol Board

Taylor Nelson

Lincoln, Neb. – Taylor Nelson, who farms near Jackson, Nebraska, joins the Nebraska Ethanol Board as the corn representative. He was appointed by Gov. Pete Ricketts Sept. 8.

Nelson earned his agriculture economics degree from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He returned to the family farm in 2012, and produces corn and soybeans in Dixon and Dakota counties with his father, Doug Nelson, and uncle, Jim Nelson. Along with his wife and parents, Nelson also operates the Jackson Express convenience store.

“After college, we were looking for an opportunity to concentrate my time and get started farming,” Nelson said. “Land opportunities were few and far between and we didn’t own livestock, but we saw an opportunity to build a convenience store in my hometown of Jackson.

Although we didn’t have experience in retail, fuel or food service, we saw it as a way to diversify our operation and bring many needed goods and services to the Jackson area including the ability to sell and promote ethanol.”

Opening in November 2012, Jackson Express quickly became known for quality ethanol fuel and an ideal meeting place for coffee or lunch. Initially, Nelson spent most of his time getting the business off the ground. Now his wife, Emily, is the general manager and he is back farming.

Nelson is now putting his diversified experience to action as a member of the American Coalition for Ethanol and vice president of the northeast Nebraska chapter of the Nebraska Corn Growers Association.

“Taylor’s background in both fuel sales and farming makes him a unique addition to the board,” said Todd Sneller, Nebraska Ethanol Board administrator. “As the youngest board member, we look forward to his input on using new marketing techniques to engage drivers.”

Nelson joins current board members: Mike Thede, chairman (Palmer, Neb.); Jan tenBensel, vice chairman (Cambridge, Neb.); Mark Ondracek, secretary (Omaha, Neb.); Randy Gard (Grand Island, Neb.); Tim Else (Belvidere, Neb.); Scott McPheeters (Gothenburg, Neb.); and University of Nebraska-Lincoln Chemical Engineering Professor Hunter Flodman, who serves as the board’s technical advisor.

Members of the Nebraska Ethanol Board are appointed by the Governor to serve four-year terms. The seven-member board includes four members actively engaged in farming (general farming, corn, wheat and sorghum), one member representing labor interests, one member representing petroleum marketers and one member representing business. The Board’s technical advisor serves as a non-voting member.

Hurricane Harvey Causes Fuel Changes

LINCOLN, NE – Due to the fuel supply emergency caused by Hurricane Harvey, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a waiver, which relaxes the Reid Vapor Pressure (RVP) requirement so E15 may be sold immediately in 38 states, including Nebraska.

As of Aug. 31, more than 20 percent of the U.S. oil refining capacity remains offline due to hurricane and flooding damage. Oil Price Information Service (OPIS) predicts a worst-case scenario price spike of 40 to 60 cents.

Under normal circumstances, reformulated gasoline and low volatility conventional gasoline (winter blends) can only be sold after Sept. 15. This short-term waiver helps ensure an adequate fuel supply throughout the country.

By blending more ethanol, the fuel supplies can go further, especially if flex-fuel-vehicle-owners fill up with E85 and drivers with a vehicle 2001 or newer choose E15, noted Jan tenBensel, Nebraska Ethanol Board vice chairman, who farms south of Cambridge, Nebraska.

“One of easiest things we can do to help with Hurricane Harvey recovery is use more ethanol,” tenBensel said. “By using our homegrown, renewable fuel, we can allow petroleum to be diverted to areas that are in a greater need, which also helps mitigate price hikes.”

E15 is a fuel blend containing 15 percent ethanol, just 5 percent more ethanol than the most commonly used fuel in the U.S. – E10.  E15 is often sold at a 5 to 10-cent per gallon discount to E10, and is higher octane for better vehicle performance. E85 contains up to 85 percent ethanol and should only be used in flex fuel vehicles.

“EPA’s expanded emergency waiver allows us to continue to show that ethanol is a high-octane, low cost alternative,” said Pam Miller, Renewable Fuels Nebraska executive committee member. “RFN recently launched HuskerFuel.com, a website and brand campaign to bring awareness to Nebraska-produced biofuels and higher ethanol blends, like E15 that are available to consumers across the state.”

Due to a quirk in federal gasoline volatility regulations, E15 sales to non-flex fuel vehicles (FFVs) are usually halted from June 1 to September 15. The EPA waiver enacted because of this natural disaster means anyone with a 2001 and newer vehicle can again fill up with E15.

“With gas prices predicted to rise for the foreseeable future, purchasing higher ethanol blends is one way consumers can help free up fuel for areas impacted by the hurricane, and keep money in their own pockets,” said Dave Merrell, chairman of the Nebraska Corn Board, who farms near St. Edward, Nebraska. “Ethanol blends are truly better fuels that cost less.”

Nebraska drivers can find higher blends of ethanol throughout the state by visiting www.AmericanEthanolNE.org or www.HuskerFuel.com.

 

 

Utech Named an Ethanol Ambassador

Shelby Utech, Hubbard, Neb.

LINCOLN, NEB – The Nebraska Ethanol Board is proud to announce Shelby Utech (Hubbard, Nebraska) as an ethanol ambassador.

Utech is a University of Nebraska-Lincoln student studying agricultural economics. She is also pursuing a minor through the Engler Agribusiness and Entrepreneurship Program, which focuses on developing business in the agricultural sector.

“We are excited to have Shelby as a part of our team for the 2017-2018 academic year,” said Luke Miller, public information officer for the Nebraska Ethanol Board. “She has a great passion for agriculture and the ethanol industry and will be a welcome addition. This is a great opportunity to both learn more about the industry, and to share that information with peers, community groups and classrooms.”

The ethanol ambassador program engages an undergraduate student in the importance of Nebraska’s ethanol industry. Ambassadors learn about ethanol production, technology, research and marketing, and then have opportunities to work with the public. They also deliver presentations to middle and high school classrooms. The program lasts one academic year (August-May) with a new recruit each year. For their time and efforts, ambassadors are awarded a $1,000 scholarship to assist with their education.

Established in 1971, the Ethanol Board assists ethanol producers with programs and strategies for marketing ethanol and related co-products. The Board supports organizations and policies that advocate the increased use of ethanol fuels – and administers public information, education and ethanol research projects. The Board also assists companies and organizations in the development of ethanol production facilities in Nebraska. For more information, please visit www.ethanol.nebraska.gov.

The Advancement of Ethanol in Nebraska

http://www.nebraska.gov/policies/