Ribbon Cutting, Fuel Savings at Bosselman Travel

Gov. Ricketts highlights Renewable Fuels Month at Bosselman Travel Center in Grand Island Friday, May 18. Festivities include a ribbon cutting for the Travel Center’s new flex fuel pumps and fuel promotions with discounts on ethanol and biodiesel fuel blends.

“We are excited to host Governor Ricketts for our ribbon cutting at the Bosselman Travel Center in Grand Island,” said Charlie Bosselman, president of Bosselman Enterprises. “Our company has been supplying travelers’ fuel needs at our flagship travel center since 1948. With the addition of flex fuel pumps at Bosselman Travel Center, we now offer a broad range of fuels, and will feature Nebraska-produced ethanol fuel, which burns cleaner and adds octane to every gallon.”

There will be a ribbon cutting at 3:45 p.m. to mark the grand opening of the Bosselman Travel Center’s flex fuel pumps, which now dispense E85, E30 and Clean 88 – a high-octane, cleaner-burning blend of 15 percent ethanol. The Travel Center also offers several blends of biodiesel, making it the largest Biofuels Plaza in Nebraska.

Friday, May 18 – Bosselman Travel Center

  • 3335 W. Wood River Rd. (North of I-80 Exit 312), Grand Island
  • Ribbon cutting with Gov. Pete Ricketts, 3:45 p.m.
  • Fuel Promotion, 4-7 p.m.
  • Clean 88 (E15) for $1.88/gallon, E85 for $0.85/gallon, and $1 off per gallon of automotive biodiesel

“We are a pioneer and firm supporter of Nebraska-based renewable fuels at all of our locations,” added Bosselman. “Selling and promoting Nebraska-grown ethanol and biodiesel is one of the cornerstones of how we market fuel to our customers.”

E15 (15 percent ethanol and 85 percent gasoline) is approved for use in all passenger vehicles 2001 and newer. Ethanol blends higher than 15 percent are approved for use in flex fuel vehicles. One in seven Nebraskans are driving a flex fuel vehicle, which can run on any blend of American Ethanol up to E85 (85 percent ethanol and 15 percent gasoline). Drivers can check their owner’s manual to see if they’re driving a flex fuel vehicle. The vehicle might also have a flex fuel badge on the trunk or tailgate — or have a yellow gas cap.

Renewable Fuels Month is coordinated through the Nebraska Ethanol Board, the Nebraska Corn Board and the Nebraska Soybean Board. Several promotional events are also being posted throughout the month on their social media platforms. Visit www.AmericanEthanolNE.org and www.BiodieselNE.com for more details.

Educational Opportunities Forthcoming for Ethanol Plant Employees

LINCOLN, Nebraska – The University of Nebraska-Lincoln Manufacturing Extension Partnership will hold two courses this summer for ethanol plant employees intended to increase company profitability, site safety and well-being.

The Process Control Essentials Short Course provides industrial bioprocess personnel with a better understanding of all elements in a PID control loop including the sensor, actuator, process and controller. Participants will gain hands-on experience operating and tuning loops using pilot-scale equipment. Several different tuning methods and control structures will be explored.

It is a two-day course held June 25-26 at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, and is intended for plant operators, maintenance personnel and engineers of any experience level who use or maintain control equipment and/or a DCS system. The cost is $600, and the Nebraska Ethanol Board is offering $300 tuition reimbursement upon completion of the course for qualifying ethanol plants in Nebraska. Reimbursement is limited to the first 16 registrants.

An impact study for last year’s course showed that one plant sent two employees at a cost of $1,200. This directly resulted in $150,000 in annual cost savings, $60,000 annual sales increase, one job retained and $14,000 reinvestment in employee skills’ training and workforce practices.

The Process Safety Boot Camp looks at the OSHA PSM Regulations and EPA Prevention Program process safety regulation requirements. Participants will leave with the knowledge needed to effectively implement, evaluate and audit an OSHA or EPA process safety management program in their organization.

The three-day course will take place August 7-9 at Novozymes Inc. in Blair, Nebraska. The course should be taken by new and experienced front-line engineers responsible for design, maintenance, manufacturing or supervision as managers and engineers involved in regulatory compliance. It will also be of value to auditors, insurance inspectors, compliance program managers, department managers, and corporate process safety support staff.
The cost is $1,720 for American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AlChE) members and $2,020 for non-members. Tuition reimbursement of $400 per person upon completion is available to employees of qualifying Nebraska ethanol plants, and is limited to the first 20 registrants.

For more information on either course, contact Matthew Jorgensen at 308-293-5884 or mjorgensen@unl.edu. Information and registration for the Process Control Essentials Short Course can be found at http://nemep.unl.edu/pce-2018, and for the Process Safety Boot Camp at http://nemep.unl.edu/psbc-2018.

May is Renewable Fuels Month

LINCOLN, Neb. – During an official proclamation ceremony on May 7, 2018, Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts proclaimed the month of May as Renewable Fuels Month. Since 2006, the acting Nebraska governor has dedicated one month out of each year to recognize the importance of renewable biofuels to the state.

Currently, over 90% of all fuel in Nebraska, is blended with locally-produced ethanol. There are over 230,000 flex fuel vehicles in the state, which equates to roughly 1 in 7 Nebraska vehicles. In 2017, over 2.1 billion gallons of ethanol and nearly 6.4 million metric tons of distillers grains (livestock feed) were produced through Nebraska’s 25 ethanol plants. Over 1,300 people in rural Nebraska were directly employed by the industry with an average salary of more than $50,000.

“Nebraska’s ethanol industry is really a win for everyone,” said Dave Merrell, chairman of the Nebraska Corn Board and farmer from St. Edward. “By using ethanol, we’re reducing greenhouse gas emissions and limiting cancer-causing toxic chemicals from entering into our atmosphere, which makes our air cleaner to breathe. Additionally, we produce a locally-grown feed for our livestock industry.”

With more than 1 billion gallons being produced across the country, soy biodiesel is another important biofuel for Nebraska. Like ethanol, biodiesel is burns cleaner than petroleum diesel, is locally produced and helps our nation’s farmers. Biodiesel adds $0.74 per bushel to the value of soybeans, and the industry supports more than 60,000 U.S. jobs and $2.6 billion in wages.

“As a Nebraska farmer, I feel a great amount of pride in the work we all do to provide our world with a safe and abundant supply of food, fuel and fiber,” said Tony Johanson, chairman of the Nebraska Soybean Board and farmer from Oakland. “We know we need ensure the sustainability of our planet, but how sustainable are we if we’re burning fossil fuels? By producing and using renewable fuels, such as ethanol and biodiesel, we were able to replace the need for 540 million barrels of imported crude oil and 2.9 million gallons of imported petroleum diesel in 2017. That’s significant.”

The 2018 Lincoln National Guard Marathon/Half Marathon kicked off Renewable Fuels Month on Sunday, May 6, 2018. The event was sponsored by American Ethanol, which used the event as a platform to engage with runners and spectators about the clean-air benefits of using ethanol. Renewable Fuels Month is being coordinated through the Nebraska Corn Board, the Nebraska Ethanol Board and the Nebraska Soybean Board. Several educational events are being held during the month to promote renewable fuels. Four pump promotions will be held throughout the state in May. During these events, ethanol blends and biodiesel will be available at steep discounts. To learn more about these events, click here.

The Nebraska Corn Board is a state funded agency funded through a ½-cent-per-bushel checkoff on all corn marketed in the state. The mission of the Nebraska Corn Board is to promote the value of corn by creating opportunities. Checkoff funds are invested in programs of market development, research, promotion and education.

Established in 1971, the Ethanol Board assists ethanol producers with programs and strategies for marketing ethanol and related co-products. The Board supports organizations and policies that advocate the increased use of ethanol fuels – and administers public information, education and ethanol research projects. The Board also assists companies and organizations in the development of ethanol production facilities in Nebraska. For more information, please visit www.ethanol.nebraska.gov.

About the Nebraska Soybean Board: The nine-member Nebraska Soybean Board collects and disburses the Nebraska share of funds generated by the one half of one percent times the net sales price per bushel of soybeans sold. Nebraska soybean checkoff funds are invested in research, education, domestic and foreign markets, including new uses for soybeans and soybean products.

Fuel Choice Benefits Wallet, Health & State

Op/Ed piece from Todd Sneller, Nebraska Ethanol Board administrator:

Todd Sneller

May 2, 2018 – Many consumers felt their wallets lighten as the numbers ticked up on the gas pump again this week. AAA reports the national gas price average for May 1 reached $2.81, the highest price per gallon since November 2014.

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) forecasts the national average price for a gallon of regular gas at retail pumps between April and September will be $2.74, up from an average of $2.41 last summer. That means we are spending 13 percent more money on fuel compared to this time last year.

Motorists, who drive gasoline or diesel vehicles, have a choice of biofuels that significantly reduce pollutants. Biodiesel and ethanol-blended fuels, especially higher blends like E15, E30 and E85, significantly reduce toxic emissions from gasoline and diesel. These biofuel choices give consumers the option of paying less at the pump, while reducing pollution that takes a toll on our health and the environment.

Each time a Nebraska motorist pulls up to a pump, they make a choice. Choosing the ethanol option is easy and economical. Nebraska has no petroleum refining capability so every gallon of gasoline must be imported, which means money leaving our local economy. Motorists and policymakers can reduce this economic drain by displacing a portion of the imported gasoline with cleaner-burning biofuels made at Nebraska production facilities from corn grown in the state. Voting for biofuels at the pump is a logical and practical decision for motorists and policymakers alike.

Several Nebraska fuel stations currently offer a 75-cent spread between regular unleaded (10 percent ethanol) and E85 (85 percent ethanol and 15 percent regular unleaded). Flex fuel vehicle drivers using E85 can save as much as $10 on every tank of fuel. E15 (15 percent ethanol and 85 percent gasoline) is typically priced 5 to 10 cents lower than E10 and is approved for all passenger vehicles model year 2001 and newer. These savings mean millions of dollars retained in Nebraska’s economy and in consumer pockets.

When we choose renewable biofuels at the pump, we save money and support a homegrown fuel generating as much as $5 billion for the state’s economy. Nebraska-produced biofuels are cost-effective, American-made, renewable, and better for our environment.

Renewable Fuels Month Filled with Consumer Savings

LINCOLN, Nebraska – Just in time for summer vacations and trips to the lake, Nebraska drivers will save on ethanol blends every Friday in May for Renewable Fuels Month.

Select retailers in Omaha, Grand Island and Bellevue are offering discounts on cleaner-burning American Ethanol and one location is discounting biodiesel!

  • Friday, May 4
    • Bucky’s – 3052 S. 84th St., Omaha
    • Time: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
    • Discount: $0.85 OFF per gallon of E85
  • Friday, May 11
    • Kum & Go – 14353 Q St., Omaha
    • Time: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
    • Discount: E15 and E85 for $0.99/gallon
  • Friday, May 18
    • Bosselman Travel Center – 3335 W Wood River Rd., Grand Island
    • Time: 4-7 p.m.
    • Discount: Clean 88 (E15) for $1.88/gallon, E85 for $0.85/gallon, and $1 OFF per gallon of automotive biodiesel
  • Friday, May 25
    • Pump & Pantry – 3605 Summit Plaza Dr., Bellevue
    • Time: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
    • Discount: Clean 88 (E15) for $1.88/gallon and E85 for $0.85/gallon

Find all the details for the fuel promotions at http://americanethanolne.org/renewable-fuels-promo/.

E15 (15 percent ethanol and 85 percent gasoline) is approved for use in all passenger vehicles 2001 and newer. Ethanol blends higher than 15 percent are approved for use in flex fuel vehicles. One in seven Nebraskans are driving a flex fuel vehicle, which can run on any blend of American Ethanol up to E85 (85 percent ethanol and 15 percent gasoline). Drivers can check their owner’s manual to see if they’re driving a flex fuel vehicle. The vehicle might also have a flex fuel badge on the trunk or tailgate — or have a yellow gas cap.

Biofuels serve as a low-cost option for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from transportation sources. According to the U.S. Departments of Energy and Agriculture, ethanol reduces GHG emissions by 40-45 percent compared to gasoline.

Renewable Fuels Month is coordinated through the Nebraska Ethanol Board, the Nebraska Corn Board and the Nebraska Soybean Board. Several promotional events are also being posted throughout the month on their social media platforms. Visit www.AmericanEthanolNE.org and www.BiodieselNE.com for more details.

A portion of Kum & Go, Bosselman Travel Center and Pump & Pantry’s fuel pump upgrades were paid for with the Access Ethanol Nebraska (AEN), a grant program administrated by the Nebraska Corn Board, Nebraska Ethanol Board and Nebraska Department of Agriculture, with the Nebraska Energy Office as the lead agency. Nebraska’s federal award of approximately $2.3 million for the AEN program came from the USDA’s Commodity Credit Corporation’s Biofuel Infrastructure Partnership (BIP). USDA rules require that the USDA funds be matched dollar for dollar with funds from state, private industry or foundations. Matching funds will come from the Nebraska Corn Board through the state corn checkoff funds paid by Nebraska corn farmers and from the Nebraska Environmental Trust approved funding of $500,000 for each of the two years. Matching funds will also come from contributions made by individual ethanol plants and “Prime the Pump,” a nonprofit organized and funded by the ethanol industry to improve ethanol infrastructure.

The Advancement of Ethanol in Nebraska

http://www.nebraska.gov/policies/